CategoryAddiction & Recovery

10 Things I Learned About Addiction and Recovery from The Anonymous People

1

The original movement to de-stigmatize addiction began in the 1960s, but it was undercut by the War on Drugs. Rutgers University in New Brunswick, New Jersey has a collegiate recovery program. There is a New Jersey state law which mandates that if a state university has at least 20 percent of its students living on campus, the university must provide sober/recovery housing. Alcoholics Anonymous...

What I Learned From The Anonymous People

W

Addiction is one of America’s most under-financed and ignored public health problems. Our current criminal justice system is flawed. Many times, people are incarcerated for drug-related offenses. In reality, they need recovery to heal, not jail time. The media often focuses on the negative stories about celebrities and drugs. Instead, it would be beneficial for society to hear more about...

10 Things I Learned from The Anonymous People

1

⅔ American Families are Affected Addiction – The film pivots on the dark statistic that two out of three American families are affected by addiction – whether publicly or anonymously.   Community is Everything – Being in a community that is accepting and understanding will do wonders in the recovery process. The Addiction Problem is Overflowing into the Prison Problem  –...

10 Things I Learned About Addiction and Recovery from “The Anonymous People”

1

Addiction touches approximately two-thirds of Americans. Much of the stigma surrounding addiction stems from the idea that people “choose” this, rather than viewing substance use disorder as a medical condition. Only 16 states in the United States have recovery high schools. Furthermore, only 20 states have collegiate recovery programs. Although many 12-step programs were built around...

Lessons Learned From Film, The Anonymous People

L

23.5 million. That’s the number of people in the United States that define themselves in active recovery. Two-thirds of American families are touched by addiction in some way, and the film stresses that ‘everybody knows somebody.’ It’s incredible to consider, therefore, how much stigma continues to surround the word ‘addiction,’ which is a legitimate disease...