CategoryAddiction & Recovery

“It’s an all encompassing disease,” Chelsey and Judy Cain on Opioid Addiction

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Judy Cain didn’t believe her daughter was doing drugs, despite what others were telling her. Despite her car vanishing occasionally, an accumulating credit card statement, and blackened spoons found in her basement, it couldn’t be drugs – not Chelsey, not her daughter. “I was in denial,” said Judy. Only when Judy kicked Chelsey out of the house did she notice how...

Devin Reaves: “years and years of failed drug policy”

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Devin Reaves visited our class last Thursday to discuss a wide range of topics including the impact of race on the experiences of minorities struggling with addiction and the importance of social justice and equity within the realm of addiction and recovery advocacy. As a black man in long term recovery, as well as a product of the crack epidemic of the 80s and a member of the Opioid task force...

Wrestling with the Devil

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Long time Temple University affiliate Jonathan Orens has never had a ‘drug problem’ in his life. Orens eldest son, Dan, on the other hand, was a different story. Though Dan had grown up in a safe environment and had always surrounded himself with good friends and loved ones, his positive upbringing would not be enough to deter his disease. By his senior year of high-school, it was clear that drug...

10 Things I Learned About Addiction and Recovery, from The Anonymous People

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Addiction affects about 2/3 of American families, so everyone is or has been in contact with someone who is struggling with addiction. The origin to de-stigmatize addiction started in the 1960s but took a back seat to the War on Drugs in the early 1970’s. Colleges and universities do you have collegiate recovery housing for students in long-term recovery. The first 12 step program came...

10 Things I Learned About Addiction and Recovery from The Anonymous People

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People don’t plan on becoming addicts because they wanted to. While public perception of addiction and recovery is getting better, it’s still an ongoing battle in treating the issues more seriously, in terms of policy and government. The total costs associated with addiction end up around $350 billion. There seems to be a pattern with the way mass media is all over covering...

10 Things I Learned About Addiction From The Anonymous People

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Nothing impacts a person’s life more than addiction. There are 23 million people in recovery. Anonymity actually causes less awareness to be spread about drug addiction. Media never really has and until this day doesn’t treat it like an illness. Helping others be sober keeps some people going in recovery. Marty Mann was an early pioneer of addiction, championing for change in the way...

10 Things I Learned About Addiction and Recovery From The Anonymous People

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1.) Addiction is a mental disease, not just a personal failing of not jst saying no. 2.) Social stigma, discrimination, and negative media coverage surrounding addiction has made many stay quiet about their recovery. 3.) Yearly, the United States pays $350 billion per year for substance abuse. 4.) A lot of process to break the stigma behind addiction was making trides in the early and late...

The Anonymous People offers an optimistic advocacy narrative we can learn from

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I wasn’t aware of the presence of sober high schools and dormitories on college campuses. The presence of such institutions is emboldening, as continuity of community in a sober lifestyle proves pivotal to developing a safe and strong social structure for those in recovery. The advocacy work of Senator Harold Hughes was vital to shifting policy and perception at the legislative level...

10 Things I Learned About Addiction and Recovery from the Anonymous People

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Alcholics Anonymous was started in 1935 by Bill Wilson and Dr. Bob Smith in Akron, Ohio. There are 2 million members of AA worldwide and the book “Alcoholics Anonymous,” now in its fourth edition, has sold over 30 million copies. Marty Mann, an early member of Alcoholics Anonymous, became one of the first women to be outspoken about recovery. She wrote a chapter of the AA book called...

10 Things I Learned About Addiction and Recovery from the Anonymous People

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25 million people in the United States suffer from addiction 2/3 of American families are affected by addiction People who participate in 12-step program are taught to use specific language to talk about their addiction. Language is crucial when informing outside people about recovery from addiction Addiction is an illness, not a choice, most people cannot simply stop. Many 12-step programs...

10 Things I Learned About Addiction and Recovery from The Anonymous People

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1. The recovery process is often shaped by private shame, and public intolerance and policy. 2. Since 1985, drug users have accounted for 80 percent of the increase in prison population. 3. The panic behind the crack epidemic in the ’80s cause those in recovery to recede back into the shadows, and stop being as open about their process. 4. AA works with 2 million people worldwide. 5. Each...

10 Things I Learned About Addiction and Recovery from The Anonymous People

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Addiction is a chronic disease, not a moral failing. Addiction affects ⅔ of American families, with over 23 million families living in long-term recovery. We must change public perception in order to change public policy and receive proper funding for health systems/recovery resources. Ex: Those who are relapsing are not treated the same as those who are diabetic and need help from the ER. People...

10 Things I Learned From The Anonymous People Documentary

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Of the $350 billion that is spent every year on addiction, 98% is spent on incarceration, rehab and other forms of treatment, while only 2 percent of those funds go towards preventing it. Bill Wilson, the co-founder of Alcoholics Anonymous, said that helping other people stay sober helps him stay sober. The organization Faces & Voices of Recovery helped bring smaller advocacy groups together...

10 Things I Learned About Addiction and Recovery From the Anonymous People

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23 million Americans have found and sustained recovery. Addiction costs the country $350 billion every year, but only 2 percent of that goes toward prevention. You’ll commonly hear advocates of recovery use phrases like “Hi, my name is [BLANK] and I am a person in long-term recovery which means to me, [BLANK].” If the public treated addiction the way it treats breast cancer or...

10 Things I Learned from The Anonymous People

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Addiction affects 2/3rds of American families. Essentially, everyone knows someone who struggles with addiction. There was a moment in American history when addiction was not treated as a crime. Before the “War on Crime” in the 1980s, there was a period of activism within government to help out those struggling with addiction. Language is incredibly important. It’s no ideal to...